Heroes of Green Everett: Cari Krippner

What do trombones, native plants, and Silver Lake have in common? Cari Krippner!

Cari in red in the back right with her stalwart volunteers at Thornton A. Sullivan
Cari in red in the back right with her stalwart volunteers at Thornton A. Sullivan

When Cari is not making music with the Rainbow City Band or teaching adults and children about forest wildlife conservation, you will find her leading volunteers as a Forest Steward at Thornton A. Sullivan Park. Cari’s passion and dedication to her community and her skill as a teacher shines in all that she does for the Green Everett Partnership.

A K-8 teacher for thirty years, Cari currently works as a private tutor and substitute teacher with the Everett School District while she pursues an endorsement in Special Education with the University of Washington. She holds a master’s degree in Teaching Conservation Biology from Miami University in Ohio. In addition to volunteering with Green Everett, Cari has served as a docent with Woodland Park Zoo for 18 years, volunteers with the Adopt-A-Road trash pickup, runs a successful pet sitting business, and is very active in her church, Advent Lutheran Church in Mill Creek, where she teaches Sunday school. Phew!

Cari has called Western Washington home for nearly 20 years and the Silver Lake neighborhood of Everett for six. What she values most about living in Everett are the many green space

s to enjoy with her family and dog, the accessibility to cultural and educational opportunities, and the laid back atmosphere. When asked what inspires and motivates her to be involved in Green Everett, Cari tells us: “I really like this project because it is making a direct impact on the future of the parks. I am making a real difference making the park a better place to be. I have ownership in the project and have a stake in the future of the park.”

Check out upcoming work parties with Cari at Thornton A. Sullivan Park, listed on the Green Everett website!

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If you want to be a Green Everett Hero, we are looking for new Forest Stewards for Everett Parks! Contact Norah, and stay tuned for an orientation for new volunteers this fall!

Heroes of Green Everett: Sara Noland

SaraNolandatSorticultureSara Noland brings a generous spirit, dedication, and a passion for the environment to all that she does. As a Forest Steward, she can be found leading work parties at Howarth Park and Rotary Park, supporting staff and volunteers at big events like Green Everett Day, or conducting outreach to the public at Sorticulture. As a wetland biologist, she brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the Green Everett Partnership.

Sara grew up in the Renton area and spent many hours building treehouses in a nearby park. She attended UW and Western Washington University, where she studied zoology and journalism. Sara and her husband bought a teeny house in Everett in the early 1990s and have lived there with numerous cats ever since. As a biologist with a local consulting firm, Sara gets to work outside sometimes, delineating wetlands and doing wildlife surveys. But to counteract the time she has to spend at the computer writing reports, she gardens at the Red Barn Community Farm in the Snohomish Valley, and volunteers with Green Everett Partnership, as well as with King County Parks, Adopt-A-Stream Foundation, and the UW RareCare rare plant monitoring program.

The Green Everett Partnership is just that – a Partnership! Community volunteers are essential to restoring Everett’s forested parks and natural areas to health. In fact, from January to June of 2015, 298 volunteers participated in restoration! Way to go! Volunteers do everything from remove invasive plants, to mulching, and planting native trees and understory – they help with educating and reaching out to friends and neighbors, doing data entry or helping with office tasks, and bringing snacks to volunteer events.

But Forest Stewards like Sara, who have stepped up to adopt a park they love and help get others involved, are the heroes of the Partnership. Without their leadership, we could never hope to care for all of Everett’s amazing forested parks and natural areas. Forest Stewards get special training from Green Everett staff and learn how to lead their own forest restoration projects. They are our eyes and ears on the ground, helping us create a program that truly follows community priorities and brings parks and people together.

…Look for more heroes of Green Everett in the coming months!

If you are interested in becoming a Forest Steward, contact Norah, and stay tuned for an orientation for new volunteers this fall!

Backyard Collective brings some sunshine to Seattle

Deanna at Conservation Alliance helped organized a crew of fantastic volunteers to work with the Green Seattle Partnership out at Westcrest Park a few weeks ago. A fun work party, and a great organization – “The Conservation Alliance is a group of outdoor industry companies that disburses its collective annual membership dues to grassroots environmental organizations. We direct our funding to community-based campaigns to protect threatened wild habitat, preferably where outdoor enthusiasts recreate. The Alliance was founded in 1989 by industry leaders REI, Patagonia, The North Face, and Kelty, who shared the goal of increasing outdoor industry support for conservation efforts. We now have more than 175 member companies, and plan to disburse $1,000,000 in 2011.”

On the Conservation Alliance blog, Deanna writes:

The sun was shining and volunteers were all smiles on Friday July 22nd at The Conservation Alliance Backyard Collective in Seattle’s Westcrest Park. More than 60 volunteers came out for the day from Outdoor Research, Nikwax, Brooks, Filson, Cascade Designs, Stanley, a brand of PMI, Clif Bar, Patagonia, and Runner Girl Races.

This great group of volunteers removed over 12,000 square feet of invasive ivy plant and created 23 tree survival rings.

Read the full post here . . .

Thank you volunteers!!

Yoga in the Woods?!

This guest post was written by Chris Blado, who leads the Kid Yoga Fun Club along with Dana

Here’s a riddle:  What does yoga have in common with environmental restoration?  The answer, according to local yoga instructor Dana Hein-Skaggs of Kid Yoga, is that both can be enjoyed by people of all ages in the beautiful natural areas of the Puget Sound region.  Since November of last year, I’ve been helping Dana with her unique program for kids, the Kid Yoga Fun Club (KYFC).  At these events, held twice a month in scenic parks around the Seattle area, kids learn fun and relaxing yoga techniques, explore natural areas on educational nature walks, and get their hands dirty pulling invasive weeds.  So far we’ve visited several unique Redmond parks, from the sprawling Watershed Preserve to the tucked-away woods of Viewpoint Neighborhood Park.  Earlier this summer, we also did yoga on the beach at Discovery Park in Seattle, where we learned about feeder bluffs and erosion processes, and tried to tackle that age-old question of just who makes those cool driftwood huts on the beach.

Want to join in the fun? Head over to the Kid Yoga website and look for “Kid Yoga Fun Club FREE EVENTS” listed in the announcements, and RSVP so they know to bring you a yoga mat!

(thanks Julia Bebrov for these great photos!)

Blog spotlight: new blog posted for Redmond’s Watershed Preserve

Redmond Forest Steward Mike just created a new blog for the Watershed Preserve and the work he’s been doing there with other volunteers! The site looks great, and the group is starting a monthly event on the first Saturday of each month that will include walks along the Preserve’s beautiful trails and some volunteer restoration work to help keep the forest healthy. You can check out http://redmondwatershedpreserve.blogspot.com/ to find more information about the scheduled upcoming events, as well as maps, directions, history of the preserve, and links to other programs.

The Watershed Preserve is an amazing 800-acre mature, second-growth forest in northeast Redmond. For those who haven’t been, it’s a real treat to experience such a large natural area thriving within an urban setting, and definitely worth a trip. For those who already know and love the Preserve, these monthly events are the perfect opportunity to give back, help keep the forest healthy, and learn more about this great place!

Great work, Mike and team – keep it up!